Wednesday, December 3, 2008

A Rediscovered Archive of Spanish Drawings: The Academia de San Fernando de Bellas Artes in Madrid

These 18th & 19th century academic drawings from the Academia de San Fernando we found on art historian Micah Christensen's blog. I've only posted 3 images here, so you should go to beardedroman.com to check out the rest & read about them.

The entire archive can be found online at the Biblioteca Universidad Complutense Madrid website.


The Academia de San Fernando de Bellas Artes was founded in 1752. Based in Madrid, it was one of several art academies in Spain (other cities with academies included Barcelona, Valencia, Zaragosa, and Seville). By the mid-nineteenth century, the Academia de San Fernando had become the dominant art academy in Spain and the model for art education throughout the country.


Anonymous (Spanish, c. 1890) Desnudo masculino en pie y de perfil apoyado en una vara. Graphite and pastel on paper. 61.9 BY 47.9CM. Colección de Bellas Artes, Universidad Complutense, Madrid.



Anonymous (Spanish). Colección de Bellas Artes, Universidad Complutense, Madrid.



G. Ponman (Spanish) Female figure from a Greek Relief Sculpture or Figura femenina (copia de un relieve griego). Pencil and pastel on paper. 62.9 BY 47.7CM. Colección de Bellas Artes, Universidad Complutense, Madrid.


As in Paris, students in Madrid’s arts academy studied, on average, for four years. Some went on to receive scholarships and study at the Spanish School in Rome. (Established in 1873, the Spanish sent winners of an annual competition on the equivalent of the French Prix de Rome.) Students at the Academia began by drawing from castes of isolated portions of statues. Then, they were allowed to study from full statues of classical origins, either from castes made of the Spanish Royal collection or from collections in Rome or Paris. Advanced students, were allowed to study from live models, who were often placed in the poses of classical statuary or from scenes in Old Master paintings. As the century progressed, classical poses increasingly gave way to more natural poses and depictions of the human figure.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

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Saad Amir said...

This discovered a nice picture of the past history.
Thanks.........
regards, saad from
Education